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While I was on sabbatical, two people in my department decided to give my research space to a new faculty member and moved me to a space that wouldn't work for me.  All without discussing this with me.

I really felt that by having a child I had given up a lot of respect that I had worked very hard to earn.

We were in a faculty meeting and I spoke three times.  No one responded to any of my comments.  They just went on talking as though I hadn't said anything.  I feel invisible.

It seems like self-advocacy and persistence are important for getting a promotion, and you can't just rely on being recognized for doing good work.  I have gotten the impression that promotions tend to go to those who talk the loudest.

Last week was the worst I have every had.  I was denied early promotion by the college promotion committee even though the deans says he would promote me.    To top it off, on Friday, I found out from the computer guy (who said he was told not to tell me) that the department chair is eyeing my graduate student space (which I had to find for myself in the first place) for the new NMR.  He’s not sure where to put me,  but promises not to evict me until he has space to move me to.

I am being told to wait until an elder colleague of mine truly retires et I am also expected to do his job.  I can not win in this situation.

An older female coworker who is new to this department let loose at me, stating that she didn’t think I was a good communicator. Her reasoning was that everyone else in the department stops and chats in the hallways before they get to the business they need to discuss.  I don’t, therefore I am offensive to her.  Along the same lines, many of my colleagues go and eat dinner together every night after work.  I am the only faculty working overload this semester, and the only faculty with any small children.I am concerned about my direct conflict with a former mentor and close colleague.  He wanted me to break/bend the rules, which I am unwilling to do.

My most stressful event?  Having a baby as an assistant professor.

I believe that my fundamental rights as a professional academic scientist have been violated. That right being to represent my own research program in departmental literature.  A colleague refused to accept what I had written for inclusion in the departmental brochure as he had already written something up for my group. Other colleagues insisted that I was at faulty because I submitted the material by the deadline but not well in advance of the deadline.  I was told that since no one else was encountering this problem, only me,   It seems that when I stand up for myself and speak my mind, I am told that I am crazy, that I am a trouble maker. What makes this particularly difficult to deal with is that this is exactly opposite to the way I was treated with I first arrive here.  For the first three or four years I had a voice, was seemingly a highly respected and contributing member of the department.  Getting cut off and invalidated in this way seemed to correlate almost exactly with many outward signs of my success as a scientist in my field.  It is then, that I did not receive greater respect that I seemingly earned. Instead, I was cut off and treated in a patronizing manner.

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